Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

eBook - 2006
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Uncertain of his date of birth or the identity of his father, Frederick Douglass came into the world with one surety: he was born a slave, and would die a slave. But as he grew up, Douglass determined that he would teach himself to read and write, and that one day he would be free from slavery. In 1832, Douglass was sent to a plantation in St. Michael's, where he would live and work as a field hand for more than seven years. According to Douglass, this life was so dispiriting and exhausting, that at times thoughts of freedom all but disappeared from his mind. His journey out of bondage was mental, as well as physical. Douglass would go on to be one of the abolition movement's most persuasive speakers, and would eventually become a strong proponent for women's rights. His famous autobiography, the Narrative, reads like the impassioned plea of an abolitionist tract, compelling in its honest and forceful eloquence. Later Douglass would serve as minister to Haiti and would fight against the southern practice of lynching without benefit of trial by jury. After his first wife's death, he would startle his associates and friends by marrying a white woman, one of the most publicized interracial marriages in America. Douglass died in 1895. He was buried in Rochester, New York.
Publisher: Salt Lake City : Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation, 2006
ISBN: 9781470398804
Branch Call Number: OneClickdigital eAudio
Characteristics: 1 online resource : multiple file formats
Additional Contributors: Project Gutenberg
Recorded Books, LLC.

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Bard17 Jun 21, 2013

Bard17 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 13 and 13

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robhoma Mar 31, 2014

When studying slavery in American History, students are often exposed to the arguments of Abolitionists and the defense of the peculiar institution by Southerners. The narrative by Frederick Douglass gives a voice to the slaves. The book is 124 pages long and very quick to read. You can also download this book from the internet, for free, at Project Gutenberg. The difference is that this version has a ten-page introduction by Peter Gomes.

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